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Posts Tagged ‘cats’

It’s official! The book launch for Guardian Cats print edition is set for July 18th, 2011–just days away.

For current news and updates. Join me on my active writer’s blog, Mystic Coffee.

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In the wrong hands, some books can be dangerous—and some libraries can be positively deadly. Up until now, Marco has been perfectly happy as a small town library cat and newly appointed Guardian of an ancient mystical book. But when otherworldly creatures begin roaming the stacks after hours, and his mentor, the elder Guardian, is killed, Marco’s innocent world is shattered.

The young tabby cat is on his own, ill-prepared for the daunting task of safekeeping the magical book of power—as well as the very heart and soul of the library. Time and space are no barriers for Marco’s shape shifting friends and enemies as he learns that the library is the most dangerous place worth saving.

Available now for Kindle and Nook.

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Some of my writing friends listen to music for inspiration, mostly notably Lia Keyes who is working on her steampunk novel and listens to Phantom of the Opera. Seems like the perfect choice for what promises to be a deliciously, dark mystery.

Normally I don’t listen to music while I write, but I’m intrigued by the idea of using my auditory senses to help ‘set the mood’. 

Here’s my dilemma though. What in the world would make good background music for a book with cats as the main characters, an evil professor and his Whisperer, a magical book of power and a host of mythological characters ranging from the dark to the light side, and settings that range from the ancient Library of Iskandriyah to a small public library in the foothills of California.

See what I mean? Suggestions welcome.

In the meantime, I’m going to check out Five great ways to find music that suits your mood,  a Mashable article that reviews several websites that let you pick out music according to your moods and emotions, rather than artist, genre or title.

What do you listen to, if anything, while writing?

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 There’s a barn cat who’s been roaming around our property for several months. She’s black and white with a broken tail permanently bent at a 90 degree angle. We never saw much of her, except to scurry in and out of bushes or grab a bite of food off the porch.

Today she showed up in our pool area with four kittens. I was so surprised, but I don’t know why should I be. Feral cats breed like rabbits. They’re the first kittens of the spring season and so it was a great start to the day and she was so considerate to bring them to where I can see them playing outside my bedroom window.

I love having feral cats around, although I’ve lost count of all that have come and gone over the past twenty years. They wander through our two acre semi-wildlife habitat as though we are part of some feline migration route.

Now at this point in my blog, if I were Cat over at Words from the Woods I would be metaphorically tying yarn around these feral cats to brilliantly illustrate some aspect of writing. Cat is the Metaphor Queen. If you don’t believe me, check out her Plot Bunnies.

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Should I let Algernon die, or let him suffer at the whims of his evil brother?

Even cats have trouble with the blank page.

Here’s what I’ve learned about writing in the last three years. When everyone else is:

  1. watching TV, I am probably writing.
  2. sleeping, I am usually writing and editing.
  3. on FaceBook, I’m…ooops…gotta get back to writing.
  4. blogging, I am writing, wishing I had more time to blog.
  5. shopping, I am revising a chapter.
  6. texting and tweeting, I am talking to my MC.
  7. eating, I am eating but it’s at my computer so I can catch up on email, blogs and news.
  8. reading, well,  I might be reading.
  9. showering, I am showering, but usually in writing mode with no way to write down the brilliant idea that came to me.
  10. working out, I am exercising my brain wishing it would burn 300 calories an hour.
  11. cutting the grass, I am letting the grass grow to revise another chapter, or paragraph, or sentence.
  12. cooking, I am throwing something in the crockpot to go revise another chapter, or paragraph, or sentence.

You gotta love writing to be this crazy!

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Writing has made me a more critical reader. My latest library book lost me as a reader because of technical issues. Besides some rather drab characters and a meandering plot, the POV shifted so often I was starting to feel the main action of the story was my ability to leap about between character’s heads. I won’t tell you what the book  is because I don’t want to bash another writer. I can tell you that the main reason I picked it up was author recognition.

Besides being irritating, it raised all kinds of questions.  How is a well known published writer allowed to commit these major editorial sins? Where is her editor? Does this bother anybody besides me?

Point of view is challenging. It was a difficult concept for me to grasp and flipping between character’s heads is easier than channel surfing. It’s so easy to do without being aware of it, but my handy dandy desktop Self-Editing for Fiction Writers helps guide me through these muddy waters.

I also find it useful to read books, like the annoying one mentioned, which ignore this important element because it makes me aware of how much I don’t want to inflict these mental gymnastics on my readers.

As a writer, it took me a while to understand which point of view I was even writing in, but once I did, it raised my POV consciousness. For me, writing a fantasy seen through the eyes of a cat, means I must ‘become the cat’.

As a reader, I don’t have the patience to stay with a book that forces me to guess who’s thinking what. I returned the book to the library. Now I need something good to read!

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I’ve been missing in action, but hardly inactive.

When I first started writing, my research lead me to use the model of archetypes to develop my characters. Any intrepid Googler can find enough online info to understand this mythic structure. My delicious bookmarks attest to that and considering I knew nothing when I started out, I think I’ve come a ‘fur piece’ as they say.

I love the archetype model and do not find it limiting in any way. It provides a solid foundation for characters with the freedom to let your imagination fly to create an infinite variety of characters. Like snowflakes, no two are alike. But like snowflakes and  real people, we all share basic elements. Understanding archetypes help me better understand human nature. That troublesome person in my life might just be a Threshold Guardian, testing me in ways that will make me smarter and stronger. This perspective allows for a ‘step back’ from the usual close-up camera lens in which we view events or people that tangle up our emotions.

Now that I’ve started on the second book , I decided it was time to grow up, so rather than clicking through my conglomeration of delicious bookmarks, I ordered The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structures for Storytellers and Screenwriters. Christopher Vogler has managed to translate Joseph Campbell, as one critic, said ‘for dummies’. This is no book for dummies, but reading it whetted my appetite for more and so I could hardly wait to get my hands on Campbell’s Hero. Campbell, however, is going to take some time to absorb. Excellent book, but slow reading, because it’s so packed. I have to be in the right mood for Campbell, and I appreciate Vogler’s  book all the more for his beautiful simplicity in gleaning the essence of Campbell, making it accessible and practical.

The book is laid out in two main sections. The first section presents the main archetypes (Hero, Mentor, Threshold Guardian, Herald, Shapeshifter, Shadow and Trickster) with examples from film. The second section holds the signposts of the journey (Ordinary World, Call to Adventure, etc.) It is very easy to read through as well as use it as a reference when editing.

So I woke the cats and we plowed through their story along with Mr. Vogler’s guidebook. I was able to identify all of the archetypes, although some of them held more than one position and two characters hold the post of Threshold Guardian for different reasons. Knowing exactly who they are and their relationship to the Hero makes it easier to strengthen their role.

I also found one major flaw in my Hero’s journey that will require a more serious revision but I’m holding a brainstorming session with my characters to get their take on how to proceed with the changes.

If I could only keep one writing reference book on my desk, it would be The Writer’s Journey. What writer’s reference books speak to you?

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The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.”

Albert Einstein

Curiosity

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